Job Classifications

Applicants to the Apprenticeship Program are required to identify the particular job classification they are most interested in being assigned.
 

Applicants should understand some of the classifications are more numerous in the workplace than others, and hence, are more likely to require more apprentices than others. Accepted applicants are ​only brought into the Apprenticeship Program when a need arises in the workplace.

Applicants that select some classifications over others on their applications may find their entry into the program delayed due to lack of demand for that particular classification(s).

The Different Job Classifications Are:

Equipment Operator

This is the largest classification of operators in the workplace and provides the largest quantity of work for Operating Engineers. As the name implies, Equipment Operators run the heavy construction equipment on the jobsite. This includes cranes and earthmoving equipment such as dozers, scrapers, compactors, backhoes, motor graders, etc. This classification offers the most diversity in operating various types of equipment in many different applications and settings

Plant Equipment Operator

Workers in this classification operate portable rock plants. This type of work also involves plant maintenance, requiring skills in electrical systems, welding, and conveyor belt repair along with the operation of support equipment such as loaders. This classification is typically low in demand.

Survey

Working from plans, sketches, notes, maps, and records, Surveyors use special instruments to establish exact locations and measurements for construction, land evaluation, mining, tunnel excavation, and other purposes. The work involves precise calculations, requiring the Surveyor to understand and use arithmetic and mathematical formulas including calculations using algebra and geometry. Demand for Surveyors varies with the needs of the construction industry.

General Construction Building Inspector

General Construction / Building Inspectors perform inspections and testing during the construction phase on such things as reinforced concrete, soils, structural masonry, prestressed concrete, structural steel, and welding. Inspectors must have various certifications to perform their work. During training, Inspector apprentices will be taught the necessary knowledge to correctly perform their work and to pass required certification examinations. Demand for certified Inspectors varies with the needs of the construction industry.

Renewable Green Energy Inspector

Renewable Green Energy Inspectors inspect new or remodeled structures for compliance with state and federal regulations. Workers in this classification must have various certifications to perform their work and have the knowledge and skills to identify and prioritize energy saving measures; collect and analyze field data related to energy usage; and inspect or evaluate building envelopes, mechanical systems, electrical systems or process systems to determine the energy consumption of each system. Demand for certified Inspectors varies with the needs of the construction industry.

Heavy Duty Repair Person

This classification refers to those Operating Engineers that maintain and repair heavy equipment. This can be a very demanding profession, frequently requiring work at night, and the need for the repair person to purchase personal tools as individual skills and experience grow in the trade. It is not uncommon for heavy duty repair persons to have thousands of dollars invested in their tools. It is recommended that applicants selecting this classification have some measure of mechanical ability. The demand for this classification varies, but is usually lower when compared to Equipment Operators.

Rock Products Industry Equipment Operator 

This classification involves those Operating Engineers who work at sites that produce rock products. Rock Products Industry Equipment Operators usually work at the same locations for long periods of time in permanent rock product facilities. In the beginning, this work may involve heavy manual labor work such as shoveling. Like the Plant Equipment Operator classification, these operators must be able to maintain and repair the plant as well as run various types of equipment to support plant operations. Demand for Rock Products Industry Equipment Operators is usually similar to Plant Equipment Operators.

General Machinist Operator

Operators in this classification typically work in machine shops operating a variety of parts and tool making equipment such as lathes, drill presses, saws, grinders, and computer numerical control (CNC) machines. This work involves precise measurements and the ability to read and understand blueprints and drawings. It also requires the use of arithmetic and mathematical formulas including calculations using algebra and geometry. This classification is typically in low demand.

Drill Rig Operator

Drill Rig Operators run and maintain equipment used in drilling, tunneling, and excavation work. Workers in this classification must use and understand the principles of hydraulics, pneumatics, fluids, and other processes specific to drilling work. This classification is typically in low demand.

Construction Safety Inspector

Construction Safety Inspectors inspect new or remodeled structures. They perform inspections and testing during the construction phase on such things as reinforced concrete, soils, structural masonry, prestressed concrete, structural steel, and welding. Workers in this classification must have various certifications to perform their work and have the knowledge and skills to insure job site safety and compliance of federal and state safety regulations; recommend measures to help protect workers from potentially hazardous work methods, processes, or materials; investigate accidents to identify causes and to determine how such accidents might be prevented in the future. Demand for certified Inspectors varies with the needs of the construction industry.